Museum of Islamic Art

Doha Qatar 2008
Wilmotte & Associés - Museum of Islamic Art

Technical specifications

Client : State du Qatar

Architect : Pei Partnership Architects
Interior designer and exhibition designer : Wilmotte & Associés SA
Main contractor : Turner Projacs
Construction costs consultant : Davis Langdon France
HVAC consultant : JBB Surface aménagée
Multimedia consultant : SG Conseil
Signage : Ent design
Kitchen consultant : Plan consultant
Building protection engineer : Sda Protec
Lighting designer : Isometrix Lighting and Design


Overview

Programme :
Interior fit-out and design of the exhibition halls in the building designed by the Chinese-American architect I. M. Pei. Creation of specific furnishings for the exhibition halls and training rooms.

Project presentation :
Interior fit-out and design of the exhibition halls in the building designed by the Chinese-American architect I. M. Pei. Creation of specific furnishings for the exhibition halls and training rooms. The Museum of Islamic Art, south of the Doha Corniche, is a project realised by the architects I. M. Pei and Wilmotte & Associés SA (design of the exhibition halls, signage, and furniture design) for the Emir of Qatar. Over an area of 45,000 m², 5,250 m² are reserved for permanent exhibitions and 700 m2 for temporary exhibitions. Visitors will be able to admire the national collection of Islamic art. Wilmotte & Associés SA focused on the flexibility of the installation, which will evolve as new acquisitions or changes of presentation occur. Known for the clarity of his geometric design, his mastery of light and materials, Ieoh Ming Pei found, at Doha, an exemplary partner in Jean-Michel Wilmotte for the museum’s interior fit-out. Designed as "black boxes" without natural light, the galleries are quite literally made to allow visitors to appreciate objects of utilitarian origin. The showcases created by Wilmotte & Associés SA fade and float in the air so as best to enhance the works. Wilmotte & Associés SA managed not only to give visibility to these objects, but also, by mutual agreement with local management and with I. M. Pei , to impart them with all the majesty they deserve as works of art. The solidity and subtlety of the fixtures and fittings come apparent in what Pei sought and which he calls "the essence of Islamic architecture".


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